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49 Comments

Today’s video of the shows Barack Obama’s response to Jeremiah Wright. Did Obama do the right thing or did he sell out?

49 comments

  1. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 1:24 pm

    well, he damn sure don’t look like SPIKE LEE…

  2. Garrett - April 30, 2008 1:33 pm

    A good commentary about John McCain worth a read:

    http://www.online.wsj.com/article/SB120951606847454685.html?mod=opinion_main_commentaries

    As far as Obama, he’ll probably still win the dem nomination, but he’s doomed in the general. His throwing Wright under the bus is too little, too late to sway voters that could have been persuaded to vote for him. Now, the spotlight will shine on his policies, and the same people that didn’t like his association with Wright won’t like his policy positions, either.
    People are starting to look behind the curtain.

  3. Alex - April 30, 2008 1:41 pm

    I’m still waiting on the press to put the same scrutiny on McCains associations (although I doubt it will happen)

  4. MrDeeTroit - April 30, 2008 2:22 pm

    I’m really struggling with this, which concerns me because I believe it’s the exact reaction “they” intended. Did he sell Dr. Wright out? Must he play the game just to get in then make everything right for the rest of us? Also, Dr. Wright, knowing what’s at stake did you have to fan the flames? Sheesh. I’m so conflicted on the inside right now.

  5. Ian - April 30, 2008 2:28 pm

    Mr. Obama exercised restraint in not breaking all ties after the first speech by Rev. Wright. What he has now done is exactly what he needed to do. I must question the motives of the NAACP for even having Rev Wright make an address at such a juncture in history……….What would Jesus do? Would he have said the same things Rev. Wright????

  6. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 2:32 pm

    MrDee,

    don’t worry, i have some pepto-bismol…those bubbles, gon’ be alright!

    but i feel exactly where you’re coming from…the thing is, he’s a politician…so therefore, he’ll never do anything that is right by us…actually just like garrett and the rest of em’, i’m enjoying this chess match as well…this negro can’t even pretend to be a negro properly…sheesh, he ruined my wet dream….every day his mama’s side comes out more and more…

  7. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 2:34 pm

    jesus would’ve said more than what rev. wright has…

  8. Chad - April 30, 2008 2:36 pm

    At this pregnant moment with various possibilities, I need Rev. Wright to speak truth to power, but just not now. His speech at the NAACP and Press Club were on point, it was like reading John Hope Franklin’s From Slavery to Freedom all over again. However, once he begun to entertain questions, he began to perform, and many who are not part of the rich black tradition, especially the black church did not, or will not overstand what he was attempting to convey during the Q & A’s. In sum, Rev. Wright, shut the fuck up already!!!

  9. Chad - April 30, 2008 2:54 pm

    Please be advised, that I am more then fine with Rev. Wright whom I know personally speaking out, I just think what can get loss in all this, is when he does the Q&A. The talk on PBS was off the chain, insightful, and passionate. The NAACP and Press Club talks respectively, were nothing short of excellent. They in fact were more compelling then Barack’s speech on race. or so-called speech on race. Wright tells the truth, and the truth hurts most white folk, along with many blacks (fuckin Juan Williams, let whip his ass, etc). Nevertheless, we cannot deny what Wright has said this past week. We just need for him to both/and, which is to say it, but not entertain questions afterward. Lastly, my hope is that he does not get get shown from an image standpoint as a clown, coon, buffon, et.al. He is no doubt courage under fire.

  10. Lisa - April 30, 2008 2:56 pm

    Oh Professor! I really can’t take this Obama/Wright war another day. LOL! But I must be kidding myself because here I am typing my response…

    Dear Obama, we get it! We really do. You really, really want to be president…so much so you denounced a man that prayed with you before you announced your (at one point in time) long-shot candidacy. You think he’s a caricature. You think he put on a “performance”. You really want the white people who are scared to death that you might actually promote the very same ideas that Jeremiah Wright proposes to know that you disagree with him. He was your pastor for 20 years and you don’t know the man that stands in front of you. He married you, baptized your kids which is all fine and good but now you want to be President. You have no time for his antics. He’s messing up your game and you’re p!ssed. We get it already!

    But really, while I understand that you can’t be black right now and “promote the black agenda” (whatever that is…) Can you help me understand then why it is I (a black woman) should vote for you? And I’m still waiting on your Sean Bell verdict reaction by the way…*crickets*clock ticking*fingers tapping the table*

    Don’t get me wrong. I still like you. May even still vote for you (because the alternative isn’t looking too fresh either). I’m not saying you have to agree with the man…but throwing him under the bus makes you look a lil’ shady too.

  11. www.rayandsamara.com - April 30, 2008 3:03 pm

    You couldnt have said it better Chad!

  12. MrDeeTroit - April 30, 2008 3:06 pm

    You are right on it my brother Chad. Thanks for verbalizing my conflict. Now, “I’m just gonna sit back and see what color the wall gone be!”

  13. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 3:13 pm

    chad,

    i feel you, especially with the whole “talk now, answer questions later”…that would’ve been gangsta…but i think it’s a little too late…they already have him painted out to be nutty, a clown, etc…man, anybody that speak that real, these muthafuggas is quick to call crazy…that’s why, i’m one of the CRAZIEST bitches i know…and i’m ok with that…believe me…

    people are petrified of the truth…everyone know’s how the old saying goes…

    that’s why we have sooooo many SLAVES…

  14. CLM - April 30, 2008 3:22 pm

    Well, it seems that the Senator didn’t have a lot of room to respond other than the way in which he did. I was surprised to hear a couple of the ‘swipes’ at Sen. Obama; they didn’t appear to me to be either helpful or necessary.

    It seemed that the Senator was speaking from both pain and frustration and not a little bit of disappointment. I agree that he showed considerable restraint, in previous weeks and months. I imagine that he may have never wanted to arrive at this sad place.

    The speech that Dr. Wright gave was excellent and really very informative. The answers to the questions were, in their own way, informative. Somehow, that session became a spectacle and veered away from the engaged conversation that some of us had hoped to witness. That portion of the event was rather tragic though, in a historic view, noteworthy for its particularly energetic exchange of opinions about a candidate for President who was indeed absent from the entire event.

    It is a source of both amazement and reflection that we’ve arrived at a public place where these two brothers who were private friends have, through national and international news media, publicly rejected that friendship and relationship.

    I see no winners here. Surely, our African American community, the entire Diaspora, and the American nation are rendered poorer because of this rift. Any who rejoice now are friends of destruction and plant the seeds of their own demise in the garden soil of their own lives. There is no victory in this pain and sadness, only loss.

  15. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 3:28 pm

    MrDee,

    that wall is gonna be white with a “comb over”…

  16. MrDeeTroit - April 30, 2008 3:31 pm

    HA!!!!! WYLTK u are a bonafide nut.

  17. Miss Dimples - April 30, 2008 4:07 pm

    I just don’t get how many people think Rev. Wright needs to stop talking. The interviews were his first time addressing all the attacks he’s come under since the Pastorgate scandal began. Now that he’s spoken out, people (FoxNews) says he’s being selfish in his motives. Last time I checked, we all have the right to confront our accusers and clear our name…..

  18. Theology - April 30, 2008 4:33 pm

    Wow, this is crazy. I believe reverend Wright has some valid points but he really screwed up. The only people he swayed were people who were in his corner already. All he did was help destroy Obama’s chances. I think he took the opportunity to Grand Stand for many of you.
    You can’t talk to America the same way you talk to a black church. Only people who truly understand the Afro-American experience would understand his style. This is the same reason why black America as a whole is moving so slowly. We act on our culturally nuances and forget that we are in the minority. Instead of holding his tongue and waiting until “WE” had more leverage he just had to “show Out”. How constructive was that?
    So what a couple of pseudo-activist go on a blog a say right on to rev. Wright. WE JUST LOST A BLACK PRESIDENT! All so Wright could go a rant. Cosby went on a rant and most of yall disowned him. Both Cosby and Wright told the truth in most of their statements. The difference “WE” want to hear how they are keeping us down. “They” want to us to hear how we need to get off our asses. Wright was selfish and didn’t care who he hurt just as some people felt when Cosby spoke.

  19. Theology - April 30, 2008 4:36 pm

    Please excuse my errors above.

  20. Ian - April 30, 2008 5:05 pm

    I must say I agree with you Theo.

    Just because someone is a man or woman of the cloth does not mean they are entirely free of bad judgments….nor free of “issues,”…nor are they always peacemakers. Dr. King never went on a tirade like Rev. Wright, and he certainly addressed the issues. So, everyone who presents him/herself as a leader of Black people does not necessarily deserve to be in that capacity. The proof is in whether they bring unity & understanding, or division and intolerance & hatred…

    It is unfortuante that the Reverend’s comments have had the negative effect on Senator Obama’s campaign that it has, but then perhaps those closest to us can hurt us the most…..It’s just unfortunate. So, Rev. Wright has had his 15 minutes of fame in the national consciousness and destroyed another brother…..business as usual…

  21. www.rayandsamara.com - April 30, 2008 5:37 pm

    This is just so sad to hear and witness. I was extremely hopeful for Obama’s chances at becoming our next president. But as many have stated in this blog, its not looking good. I think its cuts deeper because it is someone of the same color & of the same church, but Rev. Wright stole the spotlight when it wasnt his to begin with. If he was a true supporter; he would’ve stayed out of the public eye until this election was sealed in the bag and then ‘cleared’ his name. But to come out and bash Obama a week before the NC & Indi Primaries is just rediculous. There’s a part of me that cant believe that Wright would perpetuate the very downfall of our community – the crab in a barrel mentality of putting your fellow brother down so you can get ahead. But like Ian said; our worst enemy is sometimes the persons that are closest to us.

  22. www.rayandsamara.com - April 30, 2008 5:44 pm

    WYLTK & Miss Dimples:
    There is a time and place for the truth. And Wright made a selfish choice to express his truths in the middle of this political campaign. He further slammed Obama — the very person who stood behind him in order to make himself look good. There is no way that you can justify his motives as defending himself and clearing his name. And thats why comment #13 will be our NEW TRUTH.

  23. Regkam2 - April 30, 2008 5:56 pm

    theology says ‘So what a couple of pseudo-activist go on a blog a say right on to rev. Wright. WE JUST LOST A BLACK PRESIDENT! All so Wright could go a rant. Cosby went on a rant and most of yall disowned him. Both Cosby and Wright told the truth in most of their statements. The difference “WE” want to hear how they are keeping us down. “They” want to us to hear how we need to get off our asses. Wright was selfish and didn’t care who he hurt just as some people felt when Cosby spoke.’

    Theology, We didn’t lose anything, besides who says that Barack is going to represent Black people? Colin Powell and Condelezza Rice are Black, but they don’t have the best interests of Black people when they perform their job. We need to get over this ‘fantasy’ that just because someone is Black and is in a position of authority that they will have our best interest at heart when making decisions. We didn’t lose anything because the voters don’t decide the president anyway. Electors and delegates (indirectly) do. The system was designed to keep the average citizen away from deciding who gets in office and Corporate America (special interests) decide what laws they will pass.

    Another point. Cosby and Wright are apples and oranges. Cosby was running off at the mouth about poor Blacks and how they are keeping us down all the while forgetting about his children (and their antics) and how he got paid off the cartoon (‘Fat Albert’) which depicted a lot of the same things that he was bitching about. Also, Cosby was too much of a coward to talk to the people that he was addressing, instead he hung out with the Black bourgeoisie and the white news media running off at the mouth. Another difference is that Cosby is a comedian who thinks that he is a scholar or a social scientist, Wright is a pastor who was demonized by the press about a sermon he did 7 yrs ago and felt the need to speak out and defend himself. Damn,if the American public understands how Black preachers talk or not. He has a right to defend himself. This is about his dignity and character, not yours. In a court of law, you get to cross examine anyone who claims you committed a crime. Why can’t Wright defend himself? This is the fundamental problem with Blacks (particularly males) in this country, we don’t speak out or stand for something other than material gains. Yet we praise Dr King so long we don’t have to do the work (no matter how unpopular it maybe). Theology, I encourage you to check out King’s speech at Riverside Church in NY on April 4, 1967 where he blasted the American gov’t and their role in Vietnam.

  24. Regkam2 - April 30, 2008 5:58 pm

    Correction on previous post, Electoral College not Electors

  25. Regkam2 - April 30, 2008 5:59 pm

    Barack has no nutz. Each person reading this has disagreed with their pastor yet did not leave the church based off of his/her pastor said. Imagine when he’s facing a real challenge if elected.

  26. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 9:02 pm

    #20,

    samara i fully feel you (“i fully feel you” is funny as shit)…i understand where you’re coming from…the game is chess, not checkers i know…it’s just that i’m soooooo over certain things, that i be ready to wild out sometimes…that’s just me… i dig completely where everyone is coming from though…but on the real, if this ruined obama’s chances, fuck ‘em ALL…on the count of three everybody, let’s close our eyes, take a deep breath, and say FUCK ‘EMMMMMMMMMMMM! that’s some meditation, for that ass!…FUCK ‘EMMMMMMMMMMMMM! whew! i feel a whole lot better!…

  27. wouldn't you love to know? - April 30, 2008 9:04 pm

    and ditto #23, i agree. barack is missing a pack!

  28. LTW - April 30, 2008 10:59 pm

    A divinity degree doesn’t make a man divine or immune to the draw of the spotlight. My belief is that Wright didn’t want the media to have the last word on “the black church” but his error was to mistake a common podium for a pulpit. Not every message is for every time and every place. Even within the church, a discerning pastor will make sure that “a hard word” is preceded by much prayer and preparation. Shouldn’t Wright have been as careful with remarks delivered outside of the protection of the church walls? I’ve worshipped in his church several times and I didn’t find his activist stance new or all that “controversial.” I supported Wright’s initial comments, as uttered in the house of God and in the name of advancing the Kingdom. I can’t support, however, what I believe to be blatant self-promotion, as delivered to a crowd of cameras rather than a gathering of souls. I’m hopeful that “pastorgate” will subside in the coming weeks but I’m disappointed in what may become a permanent fracturing of the historically symbiotic relationship between the church and political/social change. If we must vet our pastors prior to running for public office, will some choose to bypass the church house on the way to the statehouse or white house? I hope not. I like that Obama has a church home and a sense of moral authority greater than himself. I am not sure that I would have voted for him in the primary if he didn’t. I do regret however that Wright chose the time and the forum that he did and I believe his actions were counterproductive for the Kingdom and the movement. My support for Obama has not been diminished but my respect for Wright has suffered greatly.

  29. marcjulian - May 1, 2008 1:06 am

    Marc asks a loaded question that positions selling out against the right thing. It’s not “either/or”, it’s “both/and”. In other words, Barack did sell out but for the right reason. Food for thought–Why has no one asked if Rev. Wright sold Barack Obama out in any way? hmmm…..

  30. Theology - May 1, 2008 3:32 am

    RegKam2,

    Your stance sounds like that of the blacks who rather Obama not become president because white people would no longer honor your race card.

    Condelezza Rice, Colin Powell, and Barack Obama are politicians who have constituents of all races. They do what is in their personal best interest FIRST, then they cater to the general American population, and later on the black minority. Why? We only represent 12% of this country. That’s common sense.

    Al Sharpton, Reverend Wright, and Louis Farakan have about a 95% black constituency. They do what is in their personal best interest FIRST, then they cater to the black population next, and later on they worry about the rest of America. Why, because black people come to their conferences, buy their books, and pay for their lifestyle. That’s common sense.

    The problem is that Wright chose the wrong time and way to speak out. What did he accomplish? A few amens from the choir. He also poured gasoline on the Obama situation. Do you really think that America is going to give us 40 acres and a mule if we bitch enough? Wake up! I don’t need to read Dr. King’s speech. I know what America has done. I know that they destroyed a whole race yet play self-righteous about Hitler.
    I don’t trust them fools. I just know that the Rev. Wright, Louis farakan, Jesse Jackson approach is ineffective. That’s why I agree with Cosby. I went to a HBCU and grew up on public housing. I am finally around white people and you know what I figured out? They are not smarter, a lot of times are just as broke, and have a gang of problems. Too many of us don’t want things to really get better so we can keep bitching.
    Instead of just complaining lets educate those struggling on how to come up. Let’s try to re-establish the black family with a father and mother. Let’s steer young people away from unplanned pregnancies. These things are causing most of the poverty right now.
    It is true that America has done us wrong but do you really think the government is going to level the playing field?

  31. sendschie - May 1, 2008 4:07 am

    Seriously, what’s selling out, anyway? This is a politician in a presidential campaign. Whom would be selling out, Wright…the man who sold him out first? Maybe I don’t understand the question.

  32. Regkam2 - May 1, 2008 8:40 am

    Theology, that’s not true. I don’t believe in the whole race card. I personally don’t care what whites think, they don’t define who I am and how I view the world. Besides you try to trivialize racism by using what they call the ‘race card’.

    As for your comments of politicians, most politicians don’t represent all races, just their constituents (mainly who are rich and white and male). Politicians talk a good talk yet they know where their bread is buttered (Corporate America and Wall Street Financiers). I understand that Barack is trying to run for US president, but he has not addressed any issues that is near and dear to Black people. There is no such thing as a color blind society, so stop trying to justify his actions. I am not talking about just being pro-black while alienating others, but he has assume (as well as most Black politicians) that Blacks will be there and he hasn’t have to worry about our votes. If you look at recent history, everytime a Black politician (particularly a mayor, state rep, or governor) is elected, Black people in that particular city, district or state, suffer more.
    Just because someone is Black doesn’t mean that they have our best interest at heart.

    Now, I agree that the Farrakahn, Sharpton, Judas Jackson approach is ineffective. But Cosby is a joke. Besides you can’t tell me that the Black middle class isn’t as screwed up as the poor. We all are suffering from Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome (excess partying, smoking, over-consumption, ‘bling’ factor, domestic violence, toxic diets, police brutality, etc).

    And lastly no I don’t believe that the gov’t is going to level the playing field anymore than I believe that Barack is going to do anything to better our situation in America. He’s a Corporate puppet who is going to the fall guy for everything that’s going wrong in this country all the while keeping the rich richer and continue to phucked up American Foreign Policy that has the Global community hating America.

  33. Hoping - May 1, 2008 12:00 pm

    Maybe Dr. Wright did this intentionally so that Sen. Obama would do what he did for the sake of the campaign. He forced Obama to disassociate himself from his former Pastor so that this would not be fuel in the general election. Wright knew that to get elected to the Oval Office Sen. Obama would have to be disassociated completely from him, this way Obama showed loyalty as a character strength back in the PA speech but forceful strenght when his integrity and that of his campaign is questioned. I’ve held a lot of respect for Dr. Wright and his ministry for quite a while and hoping this is/was his intention for the Press club interview. Like mother eagles pushing thier young out of the nest so they can fly on thier own.

  34. ChgoSista - May 1, 2008 12:02 pm

    Regkam, you certainly have the courage of your convictions; and for that, I ain’t mad atcha.

  35. Samuel - May 1, 2008 1:08 pm

    I agree with most of what Theo has said. Especially this:

    “Condelezza Rice, Colin Powell, and Barack Obama are politicians who have constituents of all races. They do what is in their personal best interest FIRST, then they cater to the general American population, and later on the black minority. Why? We only represent 12% of this country. That’s common sense.

    Al Sharpton, Reverend Wright, and Louis Farakan have about a 95% black constituency. They do what is in their personal best interest FIRST, then they cater to the black population next, and later on they worry about the rest of America. Why, because black people come to their conferences, buy their books, and pay for their lifestyle. That’s common sense.”

    I agree with some of what Regkam has said. I understand that Wright has been defending himself, but as I stated before, timing is just terrible. I’m still wondering who did HE consult with before making the assumptions that this was the right time to defend himself and the black church? Who made him our new black leader? Did he discuss his intentions with his “friend” of 20 years, Obama, before he decided to take the grand stand. It seems that he selfishly assumed upon his own judgment that he should tell the truth to America while at the same time tearing down his friend in the process. I understand our struggles and I understand the longterm effects that our struggles in this country has had on our race – “excess partying, smoking, over-consumption, ‘bling’ factor, domestic violence, toxic diets, police brutality, etc”. But put yourself in Obama’s shoes. If you were a long time friend of your pastor, wouldn’t you want him/her to speak with you first before jumping in front of camera’s to tell the nation the truth about themselves sending shock waves (and laughter) across the country. We are only 12% of this country so the other 88% is either learning from what he said or laughing at “black folk” for screwing up their own people. I would have to believe that the latter is the majority.

    And as much as we can’t see the world as color-blind, Obama is doing what he needs to do to get his foot in the door and sit in that oval office to help push forth multi-cultural thinking – which is completely different than colorblind by the way. Do you REALLY think that with the proud wife that he has, he would forget about his people? She wouldn’t allow it! He’s been saying the right things so that he can change the Corporate America tradition that has been plaguing this government. Placing him in office is just the first step of many that need to be done to push change. It might be a small step but at least it’s coming from SOMEWHERE.

    And not all black mayors and governors have had a negative effect on city and inner cities. That’s a bogus claim and a generalization. The problem is that many of the inner cities have people that can’t take care of their own neighborhoods when the mayor/governor tries to build the neighborhood up for them. Everybody wants a damn handout. We had a mayor in St. Louis that did wonders for our inner cities for the first year but a few years later the PEOPLE fucked it up. It’s a shame when we can’t take care of our own, but want to blame it all on the government and “white folk” when in reality, many neighborhoods have deteriorated because many (not all) parents and other adults no longer care about they’re neighbors nor their neighborhoods anymore. Many of us also have a chance to do something positive for ourselves but are too lazy to take that chance. Like actually getting a real job instead of trying to get a rap deal writing on paper for nothing for the rest of their lives or playing sports until they’re 35 still hoping to get that NBA contract (my daughter’s biological father – sorry, I’m venting).

    So I think we need to slow down and think about this whole situation for a moment. This is not just a race issue nor is it just political. This is personal and I feel sorry for Rev. Wright for losing a friend in Barack because their relationship will probably no longer be on a personal level. If you want to call it selling out then fine, but it’s for the right reasons and now it’s just business. If you had a pro-black co-worker and friend for 20 years that you studied with in the office that wanted to tell your boss the truth about your country and your job was on the line for it, would you still want him/her there. I THINK NOT! Would you be a sell out for not walking out with them? Maybe, but at least you’re the one that’s still paying your mortgage, right? Well, at least Obama is still in this race and may still be able become president.

  36. natural nubian - May 1, 2008 1:09 pm

    Regkam2, if u don’t mind me asking, who r u voting for then? Also Regkam2, since you aren’t phased by obama, how do you propose he address black people and our issues?

    one thing i’ve realized from the last 04 bush election was that with politics, you’ll never get a candidate you 100% agree with. it’s impossible because everyone had different upbringing and life experiences. so when voting, it comes down to the lesser of two evils, picking the least painful poison. For this election, I would much rather choose a candidate who is willing to address problems that minorities have, no longer pretending that if this nation just keeps on truckin’ the unresolved issue of racism will solve itself, as well as problems that affect ALL americans.

  37. Ian - May 1, 2008 1:16 pm

    I think its idiotic to even suggest that Mr. Obama may have, “sold out.” Why subject him to the type of scrutiny that no other candidate would be subject to.

    If elected Mr Obama could not change everything overnight…But then, can or will Clinton…….or Mcain? ..And yes, we all, both Black & White know the truth of what Rev. Wright has spoken. But, as for me, I dont want to be a victim any longer. And, just listening to Rev Wright rant and rave about what we know to be true does not in any way serve to correct the situation. It only serves to fuel our collective sense that we have been wronged, empowering our sense of victimhood.

    It also serves as entertainment……(Another brotha acting a fool).

    I think we sometimes suffer & act out of our own sense of internalized racism……..and what’s really sad is we dont even know it…Lets begin to reach & stretch forth toward a future of pride in our people rather than another hundred years of victimhood.

  38. ChgoSista - May 1, 2008 1:24 pm

    And then I’m feelin’ Ian, too. :-)

  39. John - May 1, 2008 3:27 pm

    And, just listening to Rev Wright rant and rave about what we know to be true does not in any way serve to correct the situation.

    There’s no doubt that SOME of what Rev. Wright says is true, and some is complete utter hogwash.

    But he keeps claiming white Americans need to understand the context and nuance of his messaging — when he himself uses none whatsoever.

    He paints everything in the bleakest, most negative terms and calls it truth.

    He claims the “chickens are coming home to roost” for the USA because of the way its actions are perceived, but then can’t understand why he is being criticized for his actions and comments and the way THEY are perceived. Could it be that his “chickens” are flying home, too?

    Wright doesn’t understand that his message would not be so repugnant if he bothered to mix in some positive commentary about his country, if he truly provided context and nuance. Even when asked, he fell back on the ol’ “Well, I served six years in the Marines. How long did Cheney serve?”

    Of course, Lee Harvey Oswald was also a Marine, and look at how he felt about his country.

  40. ChgoSista - May 1, 2008 3:59 pm

    “Wright doesn’t understand that his message would not be so repugnant if he bothered to mix in some positive commentary about his country”–>AGREED.

  41. james - May 1, 2008 4:10 pm

    john, rev wright has not, to my knowledge, assassinated any presidents, at least not yet. most of his comments at the press club were jokes. he is a pretty amusing fellow.

    the only thing he painted was his personal disdain for the poor choices made by the united states government, his personal disdain for the mainstream media, and his personal disdain for his critics labelling him as unpatriotic. i believe most of what his ideas are worthy of serious discussion, except for the nonsense about an aids conspiracy, which, with the way that aids is transmitted would never make sense.

    regardless, in america, the freest country in the world, he is still entitled to believe and say what he wants, outrageous as it may seem.

    as for sugar-coating his message to suit your needs; while that is a popular technique amongst many people, particularly middle managers, parents and coaches, not everybody uses–or is required to use “constructive criticism”–as a part of their critical repetoire. i would venture to say that it’s not part of the critical repertoire of many social gospel preachers such as wright.

    his message is only repugnant to those who lack a sense of history and humor.

  42. John - May 1, 2008 7:13 pm

    regardless, in america, the freest country in the world, he is still entitled to believe and say what he wants, outrageous as it may seem.

    I agree with this statement 100 percent. And I am glad to live in a country where people can disagree with government policies in such a vocal manner.

    his message is only repugnant to those who lack a sense of history and humor.

    I don’t know about that … the whole black liberation theology thing is a bit scary to 21st century white folks — folks who never owned slaves and who live their lives with respect for people of different cultures and races.

    Seeing white people, Jews and the government as the “enemy” doesn’t seem very pastor-like.

  43. Regkam2 - May 1, 2008 7:56 pm

    Natural nubian, to answer your question, I am not voting. I understand that the people don’t decide who becomes a president the Electoral College and Corporate America (thru their media puppets, their financing ability, and their special interest groups) do. Besides I don’t vote for evil. That’s like asking whether you want to be shot with a AK-47 or a Glock 9. I don’t want to be shot!! I choose the option of living not dying.

  44. james - May 1, 2008 10:04 pm

    regkam2, i used to feel the same way as you until i had children and george bush was approaching his second term. i enjoy voting now; i even vote in most of my local elections, including school budgets.

    john, most people fear things they don’t understand.

    and john, i don’t know where you live, but i’ll say this again, most people are racist and nationalists; most people don’t have any respect for other cultures and races. you must be living in a dream world….

  45. Beetle - May 2, 2008 8:05 am

    Does Barack Obama believe in Black Liberation Theology? When will Obama answer questions about his religious beliefs?

  46. Beetle - May 2, 2008 8:07 am

    Reverend Wright preaches Black Liberation Theology at Trinity United Church and has confirmed this in all his interviews.

    Barack Obama has attended this church for 20 years. When he was unable to attend, Obama told Anderson Cooper that he got tapes of Rev Wright’s sermons to listen to.

    Wright and Obama believe in Black Liberation Theology. This is a racist religion that claims black people are oppressed by white people. It also calls for black people to rise up and destroy the “white enemy”.

    It also preaches against the separation of church and state, and Black Liberation Theology itself is a mixture of politics and religion.

    Mainstream black christian ministers say that Black Liberation Theology is a racist anti-white religion.

    All of the racist comments Reverend Wright made come from Black Liberation Theology, Obama’s chosen religion.

  47. Regkam2 - May 2, 2008 9:08 am

    James, Whether I have children or not isn’t the issue. I want my children to have a better life, thus I have to participate in activities that are conducive to empowerment. I do vote locally, but I am interested in forming political action committees and investment groups which empowers the individuals within and the community without. We must stop thinking like servants and start thinking like the wealthy elite. They organize themselves to form corporations that benefit each of them, they create schools to empower their off springs, they create communities in which no one outside of their ilk can live, they on each other’s corporate boards, etc. While we follow what they systematically set forth (voting, protesting, complaining, watching a lot of TV which dictates our thoughts and behavior, send our children to the schools that they say is GREAT, working at their businesses trying to move up the corporate latter, etc.) America is ruled by wealth and power yet we continue to train our children to be slaves.

    James, most of us don’t have a plan to get out of debt in the next 5 yrs, thus we will continue to spend an enormous amount of energy and time making someone else rich while we barely break even. All the while setting up our children will inherit our deadly financial habits and lifestyle. Screw that!! My child (and the youth that I work with) will learn POWER and how to maneuver their way in life without debt (slavery) and how to empower the community in which they reside. They will understand that politics without economics is a symbol without substance. They will understand and learn from history, insanity is doing the same thing over and over, expecting a different outcome.

    As far as your comments toward John. Most people are not racists (prejudice but not racists), but I agree most people operate daily within their ethnicity (nationalists).

  48. james - May 2, 2008 9:59 am

    yes, regkam2, thanks for correcting my lack of precision regarding prejudice vs racist. of course, our attitudes about race will often inform our prejudices as well.

    regarding the teaching of power, allow me to share this little power mantra i use with my children: be a leader, not a bleeder.

  49. Nubian King - May 2, 2008 2:54 pm

    Breaking news: Barrack Obama just denouced his 2nd cousin. It was discovred that his cousin once used the word “Cracker” in referring to a white person.

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