Marc's Blog

Marc's Blog

Mo’Nique wins the Oscar

12 Comments

Tonight, Mo’Nique won the the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In her speech, she was dignified, brief, and poignant. The light swipe she took at her critics –who lambasted her for allegedly bucking the tradition of promoting the film for free– will be sure to provide fodder for tomorrow’s headlines. Still, her Oscar victory and powerful performance should open up new possibilities for Mo’Nique, as well as other women of color in Hollywood.

12 comments

  1. Ashley Joy - March 8, 2010 12:36 am

    Made me cry! lol

  2. lovely209 - March 8, 2010 8:58 am

    Did you see that face that Samuel Jackson made at the end? Lol.

  3. lovely209 - March 8, 2010 2:02 pm

    Did you see that face that Samuel L. Jackson made at the end? Way too funny!

  4. sun4ualways - March 9, 2010 10:28 am

    It was a beautiful moment. I am glad that she won!

  5. liam - March 9, 2010 2:53 pm

    She is so dramatic. Although i did find it moving.

  6. Unique N - March 10, 2010 12:20 am

    And at what cost did she receive this Oscar? I disagree with the idea that playing such a role will somehow open up doors for women of color when it refers to a film as despicable as “Precious”. Nor do I think it is mere coincidence that African-American actors are being given awards for portraying such stereotypical images (immoral, oversexed, uneducated). But when they pick up that script and decide to accept these types of roles, they warrant our disregard. As an example, Angela Bassett turned down the role in “Monsters ball” for a simple reason, self respect. Monique, may or may not have understood the implications when she decided to play in that poverty porno film called “Precious”.

    On one hand she could have interpreted it as most uninformed, misguided consumers would, by rationalizing it as “telling an untold story”. You know, the same excuse rappers use to justify most of the filth they represent . On the other hand she might not have seen anything wrong with it. Or perhaps she was just trying to “break down barriers” like the other stereotypical characters in early american films such as the “Oscar winning” role of Mammy played by Hattie Mcdaniel in Gone with the Wind or the buffonery of Mantan Moreland in the 30s and 40s. So that leaves us with the fundamental question of did they know any better?

    This isn’t any more about white movie executives out to perpetuate negative stereotypes about black people, any more than it is about an american appetite for sickness and how we’ll sell our souls and the dignity of our people for a lead statue. Yeah, some white folks and black folks might get a kick out of the 2009 sequel to the color purple but it’s only because in this society there will always be an appetite for sickness.

  7. liam - March 10, 2010 5:26 pm

    Unique N: I think the real issue is that we all have our own toxic cleansings to go through and some people do it in front of millions of people. That in itself opens up a whole new can of worms. Actors have never really been known to be anything more than self absorbed egomaniacs with hidden low self esteem starving for attention. I take it all with a grain of salt.

  8. Unique N - March 11, 2010 10:52 am

    Agreed

  9. Cézsar - March 16, 2010 5:53 pm

    Well summarised Unique N.

    Hollywood’s message: If you’re a Black woman, unless you fuck a white man on screen or play the role of a most grotesque revolting abherration of a monster, Oscar will be staying resolutely with his white peeps. Take it or leave it, fuck you!

    Some Black folks’ response: “…her Oscar victory and powerful performance should open up new possibilities for…other women of color in Hollywood.” Are you serious with that shit? What possibilities Marc? Would you let your sister or moms be immortalised in that way? Yes that’s right, movies just like books, immortalise the characters within them…but even more powerfully. If that movie was a cocoon-raised and innocent kid’s (of any colour) introduction to Black folk, it would surely unleash within them an instinctive hate for/repulsion to Black people. Despite your erudition Marc, you’re evidently in too deep with all this racial malaise for objective viewing – shoulder deep; so much so you can’t see the forest for the trees any more to come out with a statement like that.

    But this one aint even on Hollywood, this is the fault of the Black folk who decided to participate in this masochistic atrocity of a movie, and their Marc minded supporters. And don’t anyone dare tell me about “the movie was only raising awareness” and all that bullshit. Because if that type of shit is going on, and I’m sure it is, then put it on the news: name, shame and lock up the culprits, and protect the kids. What you don’t do is revel and bask and bathe in the corrosive sickness of evil by playing that sickness to the best of your ability and immortalising it in your own likeness. That’s beyond actiing, that’s something darker. And I for one am disgusted by it all.

    I mean what don’t you guys get? It’s all political. Why, for example, do you think that shitty American biased movie about Iraq won the most enviable Oscar over the true creative movie brilliance that was Avatar? Politics! And why do you think that if an incestuous trailer trash family had depicted even sicker scenes than in Precious, the movie would have barely made general release let alone nominated for on Oscar, or worse still – win one? Politics! Get with the program guys and gals!

  10. YoYo - March 22, 2010 12:00 pm

    Cézsar I was kinda with you until you got to the “brilliance that was Avatar” part. That movie sucked.

    What she SHOULD have gotten an award for was “I Coulda Been Your Cellmate!”
    It was funny, entertaining, heartbreaking – and in the end you could really see her compassion and love for those women. As well as her hard-ass advice to them.
    http://www.hulu.com/watch/42149/monique—i-coulda-been-your-cellmate

  11. Sasha - March 23, 2010 10:44 pm

    Can’t wait to see her portray Hattie McDaniel, she’s sure to get another Oscar.

    Hattie McDaniel – Oscar win speech > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3hpmgn7Q30

  12. Ruffneck - March 25, 2010 6:51 pm

    I hate to break it to some here but Hollywood is not a white man’s town.

    I would suggest that some of you look up the casting, movie house reps, and others who actually move these scripts to the screen. There are more women and non “old white men” than there are your typical white man.

    I liken those comments to the ones that say the music industry is all white and laced with white greed. There is no other industry in America where a poor black kid from the streets build a record label and pretty much rap about anything they want. The comments almost insult those in the industry who have struggled and made it.

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